Staff talk

Geert Schuring

Luminis - 18 November 2014

My world is: practice makes perfect

Working at Luminis

I joined Luminis in the summer of 2013 and shortly after I wished I had done so much earlier. Luminis has exactly the right mix of stimulation and freedom. I had enough of managers thinking they where the ones doing the real work and us software engineers where the guys that just had to get the job done that was laid out for them. The severe lack of insight in the complexities and challenges of software engineering had bothered me for some time, so when I met Jeroen Bouvrie in a local cafe to talk about joining Luminis, I immediately noticed his technical background. After I met two architects for an in dept technical conversation I was convinced. Luminis has a strong technical focus, with a lot of big names in the industry, and stimulates entrepreneurship and independent thinking. Exactly what I was looking for!

My sound

(Make sure you turn the sound up, or you will miss half the message in this video)

To me, this video is a beautiful visualization of what we are trying to accomplish as software engineers: getting to our goal as fast as possible, while making sure we do not cut any corners. As in racing, cutting corners is very dangerous and is not a viable way of winning the race. The only way to win is by mastering your trade to perfection. And the only thing that leads to perfection is practice. Racers do not switch between 14 different bikes. They do not come to a race hoping to win it if they have never seen the track before. They know every race is different, and results from previous races offer no guarantees for the next.

Personally I love working on messaging and service oriented applications. Projects like Camel, ActiveMQ, CXF en Karaf really give me the sense that the possibilities are only limited by your own capacity to piece together the most optimal solution for your client. The thought of having to write everything yourself is really something from the past century. A very good engineer without tools can no longer compete with a decent engineer that knows his tools inside out. That means using proven modern technology and not jumping on every train that promises to be able to go even faster.

You do not win a race on a prototype, because only practice makes perfect.

Developers interview about Fuse, Tinkerforge with Apache Camel and Open Source:

 

 

 

Geert Schuring

Luminis -

My world is: practice makes perfect

Working at Luminis

I joined Luminis in the summer of 2013 and shortly after I wished I had done so much earlier. Luminis has exactly the right mix of stimulation and freedom. I had enough of managers thinking they where the ones doing the real work and us software engineers where the guys that just had to get the job done that was laid out for them. The severe lack of insight in the complexities and challenges of software engineering had bothered me for some time, so when I met Jeroen Bouvrie in a local cafe to talk about joining Luminis, I immediately noticed his technical background. After I met two architects for an in dept technical conversation I was convinced. Luminis has a strong technical focus, with a lot of big names in the industry, and stimulates entrepreneurship and independent thinking. Exactly what I was looking for!

My sound

(Make sure you turn the sound up, or you will miss half the message in this video)

To me, this video is a beautiful visualization of what we are trying to accomplish as software engineers: getting to our goal as fast as possible, while making sure we do not cut any corners. As in racing, cutting corners is very dangerous and is not a viable way of winning the race. The only way to win is by mastering your trade to perfection. And the only thing that leads to perfection is practice. Racers do not switch between 14 different bikes. They do not come to a race hoping to win it if they have never seen the track before. They know every race is different, and results from previous races offer no guarantees for the next.

Personally I love working on messaging and service oriented applications. Projects like Camel, ActiveMQ, CXF en Karaf really give me the sense that the possibilities are only limited by your own capacity to piece together the most optimal solution for your client. The thought of having to write everything yourself is really something from the past century. A very good engineer without tools can no longer compete with a decent engineer that knows his tools inside out. That means using proven modern technology and not jumping on every train that promises to be able to go even faster.

You do not win a race on a prototype, because only practice makes perfect.

Developers interview about Fuse, Tinkerforge with Apache Camel and Open Source: